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Research News

  • New discovery offers hope of protecting premature babies from blindness

    [9 Feb 2018] Now there is hope of a new way to protect extremely premature babies from impaired vision or blindness resulting from the eye disease retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). A study at Sahlgrenska Academy published in JAMA Ophthalmology points to a clear link between ROP and low levels of the fatty acid arachidonic acid, measured in children¿s blood.

  • Low muscle strength identified as early risk factor for ALS

    [2 Feb 2018] Low muscle strength during the later teen years has been identified as a risk factor for much later onset of the neurological disease known as ALS, or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. A study at Sahlgrenska Academy published in the Journal of Neurology also links low blood counts at a young age to ALS.

  • Protracted problems walking among hip surgery patients

    [16 Jan 2018] People who have undergone hip surgery with total hip arthroplasty often experience no difficulty in walking - but for some, mobility actually is impaired long after surgery. Research under way at Sahlgrenska Academy is focusing on how advanced motion analysis can lead to improvements for patients.

  • Education and income determine whether women participate in cervical screening

    [11 Jan 2018] The impression that foreign-born women in Sweden more often are excluded from gynecological cancer screening needs to be reconsidered. A study from Sahlgrenska Academy, published in the journal PLOS One, makes it clear that foreign-born women participate to the same extent as women born in Sweden with a corresponding educational level and income.

  • Medication to prevent osteoporotic fractures may hinder the repair of damaged tissue

    [28 Dec 2017] A study at Sahlgrenska Academy has found that one of the most common medications to prevent osteoporitic fractures gives rise to previously unknown mineralization of bone cells. The discovery may be important for understanding the effect of medication on bone quality.

  • The body's own bathroom scales - a new understanding of obesity

    [26 Dec 2017] Researchers at Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden, have found evidence for the existence of an internal body weight sensing system. This system operates like bathroom scales, registering body weight and thereby fat mass. More knowledge about the sensing mechanism could lead to a better understanding of the causes of obesity as well as new anti-obesity drugs.

  • Bifidobacterium or fiber protect against deterioration of the inner colonic mucus layer

    [22 Dec 2017] If you are concerned about your health, you should also think about what your gut bacteria consume. Dietary fiber is a key source for their nutrition. Thus the quantity of fiber in your diet influences your weight, blood glucose level and sensitivty to insulin is well-established. The latest research from Sahlgrenska Academy shows that colonic health is also affected.

  • Healthy eating linked to kids' happiness

    [14 Dec 2017] Healthy eating is associated with better self-esteem and fewer emotional and peer problems, such as having fewer friends or being picked on or bullied, in children regardless of body weight, according to a study from Sahlgrenska Academy, published in the open access journal BMC Public Health.

  • Learning through drama helps nurses face the future

    [11 Dec 2017] Learning through drama has unique potential for preparing future nurses and specialist nursing staff for their future professional role, as shown by research from Sahlgrenska Academy. Using role play and exploring various healthcare situations enables nursing students to develop skills that are hard to achieve through traditional educatio

  • Increased risk of atrial fibrillation with congenital heart disease

    [30 Nov 2017] Patients with congenital heart disease are up to 85 times more likely to suffer from atrial fibrillation as adults. The researchers behind a study, published in the journal Circulation, are now advocating more frequent screenings of the most vulnerable groups.

News Archive

Page Manager: Pontus Sundén|Last update: 8/16/2016
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