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Research News

  • Cortisol excess hits natural DNA process and mental health hard

    [28 Mar 2017] High concentrations of the stress hormone, Cortisol, in the body affect important DNA processes and increase the risk of long-term psychological consequences. These relationships are evident in a study from the Sahlgrenska Academy on patients with Cushing's Syndrome, but the findings also open the door for new treatment strategies for other stress-related conditions such as anxiety, depression and post-traumatic stress.

  • 3D bioprinted human cartilage cells can be implanted

    [23 Mar 2017] Swedish researchers at Sahlgrenska Academy and Chalmers University of Technology have successfully induced human cartilage cells to live and grow in an animal model, using 3D bioprinting. The results will move development closer to a potential future in which it will be possible to help patients by giving them new body parts through 3D bioprinting.

  • New center for spinal cord injuries established in Gothenburg

    [23 Mar 2017] The new center for spinal cord injuries in Gothenburg will focus on a group of patients with considerable healthcare and rehabilitation needs. The initiative covers research and education for patients, relatives and medical professionals aimed at giving those affected by such injuries more independence.

  • Christopher Gillberg on the importance of being earnest in clinical research

    [17 Mar 2017] "If there's one thing I want to recommend to younger researchers, it is to always also stay clinically involved." Christopher Gillberg, Professor of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, is now moving to a role as senior professor. No question for him of slowing down as he enters his 68th year.

  • New research comes to terms with old ideas about canker sores

    [16 Mar 2017] A burning pain sensation - and treatments that do not work. This is what daily life is like for many of those who suffer from recurrent aphthous stomatitis. Research from the Sahlgrenska Academy now sheds new light on the reasons behind this condition found in the mouth.

  • Jan Holmgren awarded the world's greatest vaccine prize

    [9 Mar 2017] Jan Holmgren, senior professor in medical microbiology, is this year's recipient of the Albert B. Sabin Gold Medal Award. He receives the prize for his pioneering contribution to research relating to oral vaccines and mucous membrane immunology, and also for having led the development of the world's first efficient cholera vaccine.

  • Microwave helmet yields fast and safe evaluation of head injuries

    [8 Mar 2017] Results from a clinical study demonstrates that microwave measurements can be used for a rapid detection of intracranial bleeding in traumatic brain injuries. A recently published scientific paper shows that health care professionals get vital information and can quickly decide on appropriate treatment if patients are examined using a microwave helmet.

  • Difficult to get orthodontics to work in younger children

    [6 Mar 2017] Nagging by parents - and the ingenuity of the child. Research at the Sahlgrenska Academy shows that there are success factors when children with a severe overjet have irregularities of the teeth corrected at an early age. However, the treatment is tough for most children and their families.

  • A trend reversal in childhood obesity - a decline in the BMI in 8-year-old boys

    [20 Feb 2017] After decades of increasing childhood obesity, things are now going in the opposite direction. A study from Sahlgrenska Academy shows that among 8-year-old boys in Sweden, the percentage of boys suffering from overweight or obesity has decreased to their lowest levels since the early 1990s.

  • Lasting autistic traits in women with anorexia

    [2 Feb 2017] Women with anorexia display clear autistic traits, even once the eating disorder is under control and they have achieved a normal weight, according to research from Sahlgrenska Academy. The similarities between anorexia and autism in women are also seen in a part of the brain which process social skills.

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Page Manager: Pontus Sundén|Last update: 8/16/2016
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